Active Play Resources and note about ‘Risk’

Active Play Resources and note about ‘Risk’
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There is lots of conversation and energy about getting kids outside and playing right now.

Below are some resources for you to explore.

They include:

  • play space design
  • loose parts videos
  • research and evidence reports on why outdoor play matters for child development
  • physical literacy information
  • lesson plan links for teachers and parents

Active Play Resource List and links

Why risk is an important part of play?

Injury prevention practitioners in Canada are showing an increasing interest in the issue of risk taking as a positive contributor to resiliency and injury prevention among children

Read the full two page overview from the BC Injury Research and Prevention Uni


A note about the word ‘risk’: the word ‘risk’ is often used when talking about excited, adventurous play among kids because there is the potential for falls, tumbles and injuries. This wording often reflects adults’ perception and/or fears rather than the experience of the child.

For that reason the term adventurous play is used.

 


 

Developmental benefits of adventurous play:  

  • physical/motor competence (kids learn how to move their bodies on, up and around different surfaces and ‘obstacles’ • spatial orientation skills • environmental competence & literacy • self-worth & confidence • promotion of cognitive and social development • reduction of fear through natural gradual exposure • helps children learn risk perception and management skills which are important in developing an understanding of how to navigate risks and avoid injuries

Other benefits of adventurous play:

  • promotion of physical activity
  • reduction of mental illness and learning difficulties
  • promotion of independence and self-regulation (kids get to test their boundaries is a relatively safe environment although they may perceive it as ‘tough’ or ‘risky’)

Read the full two page overview from the BC Injury Research and Prevention Unit

Skills

Posted on

April 15, 2016

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